You've probably heard of the curse of Paul Molitor. But what about Chris Bosio?

Bosio went 16-6 for Milwaukee in 1992, then signed a contract with Seattle. That was the same offseason Molitor left for the Toronto Blue Jays, leaving the Brewers without two of their biggest stars.

It was also -- perhaps not coincidentally -- the last year the team finished with a winning record.

Bosio, the Brewers' second-round pick in the January 1982 amateur draft, pitched four more seasons in the Majors, finishing his career with a 94-93 record. His top professional moment came with Seattle in 1993, when he tossed a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox.

The 41-year-old Bosio is out of baseball now, living near Appleton, Wisc., with his wife Suzanne and their two children. He resigned as the Devil Rays' pitching coach after last season, saying he wanted to spend time with his family.

For the first time since 1981, Bosio's senior year at Cordova High School in Rancho Cordova, Calif., baseball isn't part of his daily routine.

"I miss it," he said. "It's the first Spring Training I've missed since, well, forever."

But more than 12 years after marrying Bosio, Suzanne is finally getting a chance to spend a summer with her husband.

"You're almost a single parent when you have a husband in baseball," Suzanne said. "We've been able to go on dates. We can do stuff together."

Now Bosio gets his baseball fix by coaching kids at the YMCA and helping pitchers on the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers, a Class A affiliate of the Mariners.

But he's mostly a stay-at-home dad for his 2-year-old son, Jace, and 9-year-old daughter, Jensen.

"Just recently my daughter has taken up golfing with him," Suzanne said. "Apparently, she's pretty impressive. Golf, swimming, anything that's outside. We have a 2-year-old and with Daddy in the pool, there's no fear."

Although he roots for the Brewers, Bosio follows the Devil Rays closely, watching as his former team tries to finish above last place for the first time in franchise history.

Former Brewer ace Chris Bosio has settled down in Appleton, Wisc.

"I would love to be [out there] with every one of those guys every day," he said. "It hurts because I love the game and I respect the game."

Bosio also respects his former manager and boss, Lou Piniella, who offered him the Devil Rays job despite his lack of big league coaching experience. Before joining Tampa Bay, Bosio had spent three seasons as a pitching coach in the Mariners organization.

And Bosio is quick to criticize Piniella's reputation as a harsh manager.

"Everybody has this impression that Lou screams and yells," Bosio said. "He's not a yeller. This guy is motivated like no one I've ever seen."

Despite his love for the game, Bosio won't return to coaching until his kids reach college, his wife said. And while Jace and Jensen know their father's baseball background, they prefer having him around.

"Jensen is really proud of him," Suzanne said. "But she'd rather have him here. She'd rather go golfing with him."